Last week I read There, There, by Tommy Orange, and listen to the marriage, by John Jay Osborn. And I can’t say that I loved either of them although both are well-written books that I would still recommend depending on what you’re looking for in a book.

I wanted to love There, There, and really it is a phenomenal book, it’s just also a very sad and unsatisfying book. I rarely think I should have read a book faster, but I had some trouble keeping track of all the characters and their relationships with each other and maybe you should just read this in like 1-2 sittings (as noted on the book jacket, this novel is “relentlessly paced” so I think you could pretty easily get through it in a day if you happen to have the leisure time). Essentially, this is the story of twelve Native Americans each attending the Big Oakland Powwow for various reasons (some are there to commit crimes, some to seek redemption, some to connect with their culture). We get lots of back story on most of the characters, which was really fascinating. I found the stories of Jacquie Redfeather and her half-sister Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield particularly fascinating — their story opens with them taking part as children in the Native American occupation of Alcatraz, which I knew pretty much nothing about. I found the ending of the novel unsatisfying, and I think anyone who likes things wrapped up in bows at the end of a book will as well — several characters are very much left hanging.

I also couldn’t help thinking about The Book Thief while reading the Prologue, which painful sets out the genocide committed by white settlers against Native Americans, another sort of holocaust.

listen to the marriage is a very different novel — whereas There, There ranges through decades and around the lives of twelve people, listen to the marriage is a sort of bottle novel. Almost everything in the entire novel happens via conversation inside the marriage counselor’s office. This is the story of Gretchen, Steve, and their marriage counselor Sandy, and how the three of them attempt to rebuild Gretchen and Steve’s marriage. This is another book that can’t be put down: there’s almost a sense that you’re trapped in the room with the three of them for the duration of the novel. Osborn (who wrote The Paper Chase!) kind of bashes you over the head with this concept, which I didn’t think was totally necessary:

“You and me, our story?” Gretchen said. “It’s what is going on right now, in this room. This is where it happens. This is what counts. If you’re not here, in the room, you don’t count.”

But at the same time, I did enjoy this book and thought it was a really interesting picture of marriage and counseling.

Currently reading: Still The Interestings, Men We Reap, and A People’s Future of the United States: Speculative Fiction from 25 Extraordinary Writers (didn’t get much reading done this weekend sadly).