I think I’m kind of late to the party on this one since it’s already been made into a movie and apparently the movie came out like…six years ago?? Can one spoil a book that came out 13 years ago and has been around as a movie for more than 5?

Anyway, the book thief is a YA novel set before/during WWII in Hitler’s Germany, outside Munich. The characters are pretty much all German, which is interesting — I feel like maybe it’s the books I’ve read, but there seem to be SO MANY books about the brave and faultless British during WWII, but not so many about average Germans. Not that WWII is like, hurting for books written about it. But, it was interesting to see the story from the point of view of two tweens/teens in Germany who are sort of old enough to understand a bit of what’s going on, but young enough to not have much say.

The main character, Liesel, is the book thief and the novel opens with her being taken to live with foster parents because her parents are communists and although it is never stated, it is clear that the German state has decided her parents don’t get to have their kids any more because of their views. Liesel’s father has already been gone a long time. Tragedy strikes on the train ride to her foster home, which seems only right in any novel about the Holocaust – death was simply everywhere during that period.

Speaking of death, the novel is in fact narrated by Death, which is an interesting choice that sort of let’s the novel be both first and third person — we know what’s going on in everyone’s head, but we also get the angst from Death first hand. Yeah, Death is pretty angsty in this novel.

I hesitate to give away too much of the plot of the novel, honestly I read it in about a day a half, so you can definitely get through it pretty quickly. It’s really just a coming of age story about Liesel learning to deal with all the loss in her life. I felt like, maybe because it’s a YA novel, it sort bashes you over the head with the central idea — the power of words. Liesel learns to read over the course of the novel, and as one might expect she steals a number of books, and words change her life, but words are also how Hitler changed the world.

I didn’t LOVE this book, although maybe because it came highly recommended to me, my expectations were too high? It certainly is a fast read, not exactly a fun one (set during WWII in Hitler’s Germany will do that…) although not exactly not a fun one?

I’ve also finished Listen to the Marriage and There, There, so those posts are coming.

Currently reading: The Interestings, Men We Reap, and A People’s Future of the United States: Speculative Fiction from 25 Extraordinary Writers